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Eoghan Harrington

Pore-C: a method for genome-wide, multi-contact chromosome conformation capture

About Eoghan Harrington

Eoghan Harrington is the Associate Director of Genomic Applications Bioinformatics working out of Oxford Nanopore’s New York office. He brings over a decade's worth of experience in genome sequencing to bear on his role in the Genomic Applications Group, a multi-disciplinary team tasked with finding novel uses for Oxford Nanopore devices and communicating them to a wide audience. To achieve this goal, Eoghan works closely with internal and external collaborators to identify and develop high-impact applications and publicise the results in posters, presentations and scientific publications. After graduating from Trinity College Dublin with a BA in Human Genetics and an Msc. in High Performance Computing, Eoghan went to EMBL Heidelberg to carry out his doctoral research. While there he used comparative genomes to study alternative splicing, in addition to some of the first shotgun metagenomic datasets. He went on to do postdoctoral research in single-cell microbial genomics at Stanford University. Prior to joining Oxford Nanopore Technologies, he worked at two start-ups: a leading personal genomics company and an oncology-focused electronic healthcare record and analytics company.

Abstract

The DNA within the nucleus of an interphase cell is organised into a complex hierarchy of folds and loops known as the 3D Genome. The development of various chromatin conformation capture methods has enabled the detection of the structures that define each level of this hierarchy e.g. chromosome territories, A/B compartments, topologically associated domains (TADs) and promoter-enhancer loops. This in turn has facilitated functional studies which have uncovered some of the mechanisms behind the formation and maintenance of these structures, as well as their effect on gene expression. However, most of these studies rely on methods that could only capture interactions between two points on the genome, and thus lacked the ability to resolve higher-order interactions. We will share our progress on Pore-C, a method to generate genome-wide, multi-contact chromatin conformation maps. We will also demonstrate how it can be used to improve whole genome assemblies and help resolve complex structural variants in cancer.

Eoghan Harrington

Eoghan Harrington

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